Smoky Poblano Corn Chowder

Smoky Poblano Corn Chowder

I tend to go with the flow when it comes to cooking (and most things in life). Never really having a set menu for the week, most of my ideas come from random places. The other day I saw a beautiful bunch of white asparagus and purple Brussels sprouts and loaded up my cart. I’ve also been known to buy things with absolutely no idea of what I’m going to do with them.  Other times I’m inspired by the beauty of food photographs. But most of the time, dinner is mood and taste-dependent!

Lately, and for obvious reasons, I’ve been craving warm comfort foods.

When I think of winter, I think of hearty soups and stews. Enter the Smoky Poblano Corn Chowder. It has nearly all my favorite ingredients, corn, potatoes, chili peppers, coconut milk, and Mexican spices. I mean, who doesn’t love cumin and coconut milk? I made a tasty bouquet of roasted corn, sprouted lentils, and microgreens seasoned with the same spices as the soup for a garnish. I love that it comes together quickly and that it tastes so damn good. You can skip the garnish if you are so inclined; however, it’s a major flavor bomb, it’s also gorgeous, and I highly recommend it. And don’t forget to give each bowl a light dusting of chili powder.

I wanted some texture, but I also wanted thick and creamy. Some recipes use corn starch to thicken, but I’m not a fan. So when the chowder was done cooking, I took about a third of it (about 3 cups), put it in the blender, then added it back into the soup. It worked perfectly. This recipe serves 4-6, but it is easily doubled and will keep in the freezer for up to two months.

As always, tag me and let me know if you liked it.

Stay Warm,
Steph


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Smoky Poblano Corn Chowder

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 30
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 4-6 cups 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced
  • 1/2 cup carrots, julienned
  • 1 large poblano chili, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, grated 
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon Mexican oregano
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 4 medium (skin on) potatoes, washed and diced
  • 3 cups fresh or frozen corn*
  • 1 can full fat coconut milk

Garnish:

  • 1/2 cup corn kernals
  • 1/2 cup micro-greens
  • 1/4 cup sprouted lentils (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Mexican oregano

 

 


Instructions

Garnish:

  1. Mix all ingredients well in a small bowl and set aside.

Chowder:

  1. Warm a medium-size skillet over medium-high heat, add onion, celery, carrot, chili, and 2-3 tablespoons vegetable stock. Saute for 4-5 minutes until vegetables begin to soften. Add garlic and spices cook for 1-2 minutes.
  2. Stir in broth, scraping the bottom of the pot to remove any browned bits.
  3. Add potatoes and corn. Stir, bring to a simmer, and reduce heat to medium-low.
  4. Cover and cook for 15-20 minutes until potatoes are fork-tender. Reduce heat to low.
  5. Add coconut milk and whisk into the soup mixture.
  6. Adjust seasonings. Careful with the oregano as it can make the soup bitter.
  7. Ladle into bowls and garnish.
  8. Serve
  9. Enjoy!

Notes

Do not use canned corn if possible.  Canned vegetables have a metallic taste and are often loaded with sodium (preservatives).   In the winter frozen organic corn is best.

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Curried Zucchini Soup with Pistachio Parmesan Noodles

Curried Zucchini Soup with Pistachio Parmesan Noodles

Happy New Year! I hope you are well and enjoyed some form of relaxation with those you love! The holidays can be joyful but a bit of a whirlwind and are here and gone in the blink of an eye! Don’t get me wrong, I love every minute between Halloween and New Year’s, but this year was particularly busy and took a little bit of a toll on my health! I am just now starting to feel better after a rough bout of bronchitis, which I used to get all the time as a kid. Secondhand smoke is fo’ real, and my lungs are physically scarred from years and years of coughing from inhaling the toxic fog. Another reason Covid kinda scares me, ya know?

But this was also the first time I’d been sick in just over 6 years. And I can’t get sick! I have people who depend on me to cook, clean, transport, teach, write, exercise, volunteer, and well, the list goes on and on. And not to mention, cooking for me is a way of relaxing and being creative. So, what’s a girl to do if she can’t cook for nearly 3 weeks? Read, rest, and reflect—a lot. And when I got well enough to cook again, I returned to the kitchen with a significant mind shift. At the forefront was the question, “Am I really feeding myself if I’m not feeding myself well?” Deep, I know. But, alas, you are what you eat.

Listen, I am by no means a junk food vegan, but I not gonna lie. I love chips and cashew queso, like, a lot. And sometimes I get lazy. I also get caught up in convenience foods, Doordash, and sometimes, skipping meals entirely. I also give in to unhealthy cravings, and sometimes I do not feed my body well. This is a far cry from my early days as a plant-based eater–when I was all in. All. In. No oil, no processed anything, no wheat, no starchy stuff. I was a well-oiled machine, lost a bunch of weight, and felt ten years younger. I still feel 10 years younger, but the weight is slowly creeping back, and admittedly, I’m feeling a little rusty.

So the first several days back in the kitchen, I made only raw foods for 4 days. I was amazed at how light yet full and satisfied I felt. I started reading about the miraculous enzymatic functions found in whole foods and how cooking foods actually kill these beneficial enzymes that our food is trying to provide us. I’m not sure I will ever be 100% raw, but I’m definitely game for 50-75%, and who knows!

That said, I’m super excited to share this recipe with you. This oil-free soup is super healthy and completely delicious. It’s also 50% cooked and 50% raw. Part soup part salad (who says ya can’t), I added a Yukon gold to help thicken, some green peas to help brighten, and topped it with a raw zucchini salad that makes me want only to grow zucchini’s in my garden this summer! Pistachios give it a nice crunch and a little protein boost. The basil gives it depth, and the parmesan cheese, well, you know…! Let me know if you made it and how you liked it. I love hearing from y’all. Until next time!

–Steph


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Curried Zucchini Soup with Pistachio Parmesan Noodles

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4 cups 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Delicious and creamy this dairy-free, oil-free soup, will leave you wanting seconds!


Ingredients

Scale

Soup:

  • 2 tablespoons organic vegetable stock 
  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, peeled and chopped
  • ½ jalapeño, seeded and chopped
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 teaspoons organic curry powder
  • 23 pounds organic zucchini (about 3 large), 5-6 cups diced, 2 cups spiralized
  • 1 cup frozen organic peas
  • 1 small Yukon gold potato, diced
  • 4 cups organic vegetable stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Noodle Salad Garnish :

  • 2 cups organic zucchini noodles
  • 1 tablespoon organic lemon juice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons organic basil, minced
  • 1/2 cup raw pistachios, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup vegan parmesan
  • 1/8 tsp fresh ground pepper

Instructions


Notes

*When hot food is inside a blender, and a lid is placed on top, it heats the air above between the food and the blender lid, causing pressure to build up in the blender jar. This pressure can cause the top to blow right off as hot food explodes out the top of the blender jar. Trust me. It’s no fun to clean soup off everything, including the ceiling.

Keywords: no oil soup, zucchini soup, vegan soups

 

Chicken-less Noodle Soup

Chicken-less Noodle Soup

So I spent most of my winter break after Christmas in bed. I’m pretty sure from burning the candle at both ends and running in the rain, I wore myself down and ended up with a nasty case of bronchitis. My husband who somehow managed to avoid it insisted that I rest and took over as my personal chef and nurse. He made me this fantastic soup, and I figured it was well worth writing up a recipe! Sometimes the only thing (besides a Z-Pak) that makes you feel better is a lot of TLC and a good old-fashioned bowl of warm noodle soup.

The ultimate comfort food, this recipe uses tofu rubbed with poultry seasoning and baked until firm. It was so good and hit the spot. He drained and pressed the tofu and then pulled it apart by hand to give it that irregular shape like pulled chicken. He dredged it in a little bit of olive oil and tossed it in poultry seasoning. We use Trader Joe’s chicken-less seasoning, but alas, it’s discontinued. I liked TJ’s seasoning because it had turmeric, a great anti-inflammatory and antioxidant! But never fear. Here is another excellent poultry seasoning with turmeric that will also work! If you can’t find a seasoning mix with turmeric, be sure to add a teaspoon to your soup! 

He baked the tofu for 25 minutes, turned it once, and baked for another 15 minutes.  He also used egg-free ribbon noodles. But if you’re feeling somewhat nostalgic, you can use spaghetti broken into quarters for a more Campbell’s soup kinda feel.


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Chicken-less Noodle Soup

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 50
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 (14-oz) block organic extra-firm tofu, drained, and pressed
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons poultry seasoning
  • 1 cup sweet onion, diced
  • 1 cup celery, diced
  • 1 cup carrot, peeled and sliced into 1/4” rounds
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried dill (or 1 tablespoon fresh dill)
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 8 cups vegetable broth or stock
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce (I use Bragg’s Liquid Aminos)
  • 8 oz. pasta of choice, broken into bite-sized pieces if applicable
  • Salt, to taste 

Instructions

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Drain the tofu package,  and press the tofu for about 20 minutes while the oven preheats. (We use a tofu press, but you can also wrap the tofu in a clean towel and stack something heavy like a cast iron pan on top of it).
  2. Break the tofu apart into irregular shapes, or roughly chop it, add to a bowl.
  3. Toss tofu in olive oil and sprinkle with poultry seasoning, coating generously.
  4. Place the tofu pieces on the baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, flip the tofu and bake for another 15-250 minutes, or until firm and slightly crispy. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  5.  Warm a large saucepan over medium heat, then add 1/4 cup of vegetable stock.
  6. Add the onion, celery, and carrot, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally. If the vegetables start to brown, turn the heat to medium-low and add additional stock one tablespoon at a time. Saute vegetables until the onions and celery are translucent, 5 to 7 minutes.
  7. Add the garlic, dill, red pepper flakes, thyme, black pepper, and stir. Cook until fragrant, 60 to 90 seconds.
  8. Add the broth and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and stir in the soy sauce, pasta, and baked tofu chunks. Continue to cook for 10-12 minutes or until the pasta is tender.
  9. Add additional salt and pepper if necessary.
  10. Garnish with fresh thyme, dill, and parsley, if desired.

Keywords: Vegan Soup, Vegan Noodle Soup

Mediterranean Cucumber Soup with Dill and Walnuts

Mediterranean Cucumber Soup with Dill and Walnuts

Some things are just meant to be together-peanut butter & jelly, socks and shoes, Kurt and Goldie, and cucumbers & Dill. An American mainstay, cucumber seeds were brought to North America by European settlers in the late 16th century. The cucumber, however, is native to India, and at around 3,000 years old, it is one of the world’s oldest cultivars.

Cucumbers belong to the Cucurbitaceae family.  Other members of this family include watermelon, muskmelon, pumpkin, and squash. Some fun cucumber facts:

  • Cucumbers contain 96 percent water.
  • The inside of a cucumber can be up to 20 degrees cooler than its outside.
  • One-half cup of sliced cucumbers contains only eight calories.
  • Fresh extracts from cucumbers have recently been shown to have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

When I was a kid, a cucumber is what my mom diced up and put on a salad. Since then, I’ve used them as crudités, made pickles out ’em, and I love them as under-eye pads for puffy eyes. But until now, I’ve never had them as the main star of a soup! You can also use them (in no particular order) to:

  • Got a slug or grub problem? Dice cucumbers and put them on an aluminum pan in the garden. The aluminum reacts with the cucumber and gives off a scent they don’t care for.
  • For their fiber and water, which helps fight constipation.
  • Got some funky bugs? They contain erepsin, an enzyme, which is known to kill tapeworms.
  • As a hangover cure because they have enough B vitamins, electrolytes, and sugar to replenish essential nutrients that alcohol absorbs from your body.
  • Reducing cellulite. Applying slices directly to the skin allows phytochemicals in cucumbers to tighten collagen for a firm complexion.
  • Grow long, beautiful hair. Cucumber juice provides silicon, sodium, calcium, sulfur, etc., all of which are nutrients needed for hair growth and hair strengthening.
  • Got a toddler? They can even remove crayons, markers, and pen marks on walls.

The other main ingredient in the soup is our friend, Dill. Dill, as we all know, is an herb. But did you know that it has health benefits that are almost too many to name? Dill is packed with flavonoids, which have been shown to help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. But that’s not the only reason Dill is thought to improve heart health. Research on animals shows that Dill can also reduce LDL cholesterol levels. Thank you, WebMD! Dill also:

  • Can help regulates Diabetes– The presence of bioactive ingredient Eugenol in dill leaves has potent anti-diabetic properties, which play a crucial role in alleviating the blood sugar levels within the body.
  • Promotes Digestion.
  • Fortifies Bone Health.
  • Prevents Infections.
  • Remedies Insomnia

Add in some heart-healthy walnuts and friends. This soup might be a magic elixir, the proverbial unicorn of soups! With roots in eastern Europe, this Mediterranean “çorba” (Turkish for soup) is similar to the Turkish Casik, which uses yogurt as its base. I tried various versions of this, and I settled on this version. I loved the addition of red pepper flakes and tarragon! If you make it, tag me and let me know how you liked it!


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Mediterranean Cucumber Soup with Dill and Walnuts

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 large European (traditional) cucumber, or 3 small Persian cucumbers, small diced
  • 2 cups plain vegan greek style yogurt (I used Kite Hill)
  • 1 cup ice cold water
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 small scallions, trimmed and diced
  • 1 large garlic clove, peeled
  • 1/2 cup fresh dill
  • 1/4 cup loosely packed fresh parsley, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon dried tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • salt
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 red onion, diced
  • 2/3 cup shelled walnuts, finely chopped

Instructions

  1. Place a colander in a sink or over a bowl, add cucumbers and salt. Stir well, and let sit for about 15 minutes.
  2. Whisk olive oil, yogurt, and lime juice together until smooth.
  3. Gradually whisk in water until you achieve the desired consistency.
  4. In a mortar or a bowl, grind garlic clove with a pinch of salt into a paste.
  5. Add garlic, cucumbers, scallions, walnuts, and spices. Mix thoroughly.
  6. This step is optional, but you can add one ice cube to each bowl and then ladle the soup on top.
  7. Garnish each bowl with chopped parsley, one thin slice of lime, red pepper flakes, sliced red onion, olive oil, and walnuts.
  8. Enjoy!

Notes

Japanese cucumbers would also work.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 134 calories

Keywords: Vegan Soup, cucumber soup

Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon


I have a potato obsession. But my favorite potato is the mighty sweet potato. Unlike a regular potato, a nightshade family member, the sweet potato is a large edible root within the morning glory family. And sweet potatoes come in many colors too!

While potatoes with orange flesh are the richest in beta-carotene. Sweet potatoes with purple flesh are richer in anthocyanins. Beta-carotene and anthocyanins are naturally occurring plant “Phyto” chemicals that give vegetables their bright colors. Phytochemicals are biologically active compounds found in plants and are known to:

  • Aid the function of the immune system.
  • Protect cells and DNA from damage that may lead to cancer.
  • Reduce inflammation.
  • Slow the growth rate of some cancer cells.
  • Help regulate hormones.

Why use a purple potato? Because anthocyanins have the capacity to lower blood pressure, improve visual acuity, reduce cancer cell proliferation, inhibit tumor formation, prevent diabetes, and lower the risk of CVD, which modulates cognitive and motor function.

This pretty warm winter soup was inspired by another anthocyanin…the açaí bowl!. It’s super healthy comes together very quickly. You can easily make this a “no-oil” soup by steaming your vegetables instead of roasting them. 

If you choose to use oil, be sure to keep the temperature well below the oil’s smoke point or the point at which the oil starts to burn (that’s about 410 degrees for extra virgin or unrefined olive oil). Because overheating oil breaks down the nutritional composition of the oil changes the flavor, and releases harmful free radicals. 


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Purple Sweet Potato Soup with Roasted Cauliflower and Tarragon

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch

Description

I added a delicious beet puree to this soup, but you can add whatever you want.  Good choices might be pieces of roasted cauliflower, pumpkins seeds, hemp seeds, or soy cream. 


Ingredients

Scale
  • 3 large purple sweet potatoes, peeled and medium diced
  • 1 large head of organic cauliflower, chopped into medium florets
  • 2 large leeks, white part only, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, mined
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon
  • 1 (32 oz) container organic vegetable stock
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Add chopped potatoes and cauliflower to a mixing bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. 
  3. Add spices to a small bowl and mix well. 
  4. Spread vegetables evenly on a parchment-lined baking sheet. 
  5. Sprinkle the spice mix over vegetables. Place baking sheet in the oven, and roast vegetable for 30 minutes, turning vegetables at the half-way mark. 
  6. When vegetables are done, remove from oven and let cool. 
  7. Warm a dutch oven over medium heat. When the pan is heated, add oil. When oil begins to shimmer, add the leeks and saute until leeks have softened and are slightly brown. 
  8. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds to a minute. 
  9. Add cooled vegetables and vegetable stock to a dutch oven, and stir. 
  10. When the soup is warmed, use an immersion blender, or carefully ladle half of the soup mixture into a blender. (If using a high-speed blender, be careful to hold the lid, as the heat can build pressure and the lid can fly off). Continue until all the soup is blended to the consistency you prefer. **I blended the first batch until entirely smooth. For the second batch, I blended it to have some texture and then mixed the two. 
  11. Return to dutch oven and taste for seasoning. 
  12. Serve warm and top with fresh tarragon, roasted cauliflower, hemp seeds, pumpkins seeds (pepita’s), or beet puree. 

Notes

**While blending the soup, I placed the first pureed batch into a large mixing bowl.  

Carla’s Creamy Asparagus Pea Soup

Carla’s Creamy Asparagus Pea Soup

My friend Carla asked me for this recipe the other day. I had made this soup for a cooking class once, and she loved it! However, the recipe has taken a few twists and turns since the class. Each time I make it, I think to myself, “It’s close, but no cigar.” I finally realized what was missing when I added a small jalapeño to the mix of roasted veggies!

 The soup is delicious, either hot or cold, and can be served as a winter warmer or cold as an early spring delight! Either way, you can’t go wrong. The other best part? It takes less than 30 minutes to make! You can leave the jalapeño if you like a little heat or remove it if you don’t.  Here you go Carla!


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Creamy Asparagus and Pea Soup

  • Author: Stephanie Bosch
  • Prep Time: 5
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 Cups 1x
  • Category: Soup
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 Tbsp olive or avocado oil
  • 12 ounces asparagus (1 large bundle) bottom of stocks, removed
  • 4 cloves garlic , peeled
  • 1 sweet Vidalia onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 jalapeño, top and seeds removed
  • 10 fresh tarragon leaves, or 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon
  • 10 ounces fresh or frozen peas (2 cups yield ~10 ounces)
  • 1 tsp Salt + 1/2 tsp Pepper
  • 1 cup cashew cream (can also use plant-based milk, just won’t be as creamy)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth (DIY or store-bought)
  • 12 Tbsp nutritional yeast (optional // for a slightly cheesy flavor)
  • 1/2 medium lemon (optional // juiced // for brightness)

    Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 400°. 
    2. Prepare a parchment-lined baking sheet.
    3. In a medium bowl, add trimmed asparagus, quartered onion, garlic cloves, tarragon, and jalapeño. Toss with avocado oil.
    4. Add all ingredients to the baking sheet. *See Note
    5. Bake for 10 minutes, remove from oven, turn vegetables. Return to oven and bake for an additional 10 minutes. 
    6. When vegetables are done, reserve 8 asparagus tips.  Then and add remaining ingredients to a blender with the peas and half of the vegetable stock. Be sure to hold the blender lid when blending as the heat and pressure can build, and the top will fly off. (It’s happened). When mixed well, add purée to a dutch oven over medium heat. Then add remaining stock, nutritional yeast, salt, pepper, and cashew cream.  Simmer until warmed through.  Finish soup with lemon juice.   Taste for seasonings. 
    7. Serve with croutons and asparagus tips.

    Notes

    *I like to stack my tarragon and garlic pieces on top of the asparagus to keep them from having direct contact with pan.  It helps to prevent them from burning.  


    Nutrition

    • Serving Size: 4 cups
    • Calories: 298

    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    We are so fortunate to have the best Indian grocery store not too far from our house. There are aisles upon aisles of spices, rice, and about a hundred kinds of dal! Dal is often translated as “lentils” but refers to a split version of various lentils, peas, chickpeas (chana), kidney beans, and so on. If a pulse, or bean, is split in half, it is called a dal. So the chana dal that I used for this recipe is a split chickpea! 

    To me, the best part of this recipe was the addition of whole spices. Imagine how good your kitchen will smell while sautéing onions, cloves, a whole cinnamon stick, and cardamom. Delicious! You can use any green on hand, I just happened to have some spinach that needed to be used, but kale is a great option, too.

    This is an easy recipe for the Instant pot too. Use the sauté feature to cook the onions and spices. Then pick-up the recipe at step three and cook on high for 15 minutes. I cubed and browned my sweet potatoes before adding them to the lentils. If you don’t roast them or brown them first, you run the risk of them becoming mushy. 


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    Curried Dal with Spinach and Sweet Potato

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 5
    • Cook Time: 25
    • Total Time: 30 minutes
    • Yield: 68 cups 1x

    Description

    Curried dal is deliciously satisfying and super easy to make!  You will also have plenty of leftovers!  Serve with warmed naan or toasted bread. 


    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 1 pound dal
    • 3 green cardamom pods
    • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
    • 1 cinnamon stick
    • 3 whole cloves
    • 1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced
    • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 1 tablespoon peeled and grated ginger
    • 1 Serrano chile, stemmed and finely sliced
    • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cubed 
    • 1/3 cup yellow curry paste
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
    • 10 oz fresh baby spinach
    • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
    • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
    • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
    • 1 lime, juiced
    • 1 full 15 oz can full fat coconut milk
    • Rice
    • Garnish with yogurt, and cilantro, and smoked paprika

    Instructions

    1. Rinse the lentils in a strainer in cold water until the water runs clear, then place in a medium bowl, cover with water, and set aside. Using the side of a knife, carefully crack open the cardamom pods.
    2. Add 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil into a large pot over medium heat. When hot, add the cardamom pods, cinnamon stick, and cloves. Cook for about a minute, then add the onions. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently until the onions are browning and soft. Add garlic, ginger, and chile and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove cinnamon stick. 
    3. Drain lentils and add to the pot; add turmeric, curry paste, and 4 1/4 cups of hot water. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once they are boiling, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the lentils are soft and creamy.
    4. While lentils are cooking, warm a skillet over medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon of coconut oil, and when shimmering, add sweet potatoes. Brown potatoes on all sides and cook until they are almost fork tender. Remove from pan and set aside. 
    5. In the same pan, add the remaining tablespoon of coconut oil over medium heat and, when shimmering, add the mustard seeds. When the seeds pop, add the reserved onion mixture and fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the spinach, shredded coconut, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt—Cook for 1 minute. Add the lime juice and stir.
    6. When the lentils are soft and creamy, add the coconut milk and remaining salt.  Add spinach mixture and sweet potatoes—taste for seasoning.  Cook for 5 more minutes, or until potatoes have warmed through.  I added just a bit more curry paste to mine, but I like heat!  Serve in a bowl, and spoon over rice. Top with yogurt, cilantro, and smoked paprika.

    T-Kat’s Chile Verde

    The other day my friend Kathy asked for a Chile Verde recipe. The truth is, I’d never made it before. Strange, I know, considering Mexican food is my all time number one favorite food. After several hours of watching YouTube videos of mostly non-english speaking women, I set out to make this delectable dish.

    Do you know the difference is between “chili” and”chile”? In American English, “chili” is the most common spelling for the spicy peppers and the stew. In British English the preferred spelling is “chilli.” In Spanish speaking countries and regions of the US, “chile” is the most common variant. Because I spent several hours watching YouTube videos of Spanish speaking ladies making this authentic and delectable dish, we are going to call it chile!

    A traditional Chile Verde is made with pork shoulder and potatoes simmered in a spicy green chili sauce. Aside from the obvious, there were several traditional elements that I found muy importante in making this recipe. The first being the use of the molcajete, or the Mexican mortar and pestle. If you don’t have one, don’t worry. You can simply cut your ingredients into thin slices, then give them a good smashing with the underside of your favorite coffee mug (the heavier the mug, the better), or add the ingredients to a ziplock bag and use a rolling pin.

    I slow simmered browned soy curls and potatoes in the green verde sauce, which is made from garlic, onion, cilantro, four kinds of peppers, and roasted tomatillo’s. Ahhhmaaazing! Here ya are, Miss Kathy!


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    T-Kat’s Chile Verde

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 15
    • Cook Time: 45
    • Total Time: 1 hour
    • Yield: 68 cups 1x

    Description

    Vegan version of Chile Verdes!   Even your pork loving friends will be amazed at this deliciously savory and hearty dish! 


    Ingredients

    Scale
     

    For Verde Sauce:

    • 1 1/2 pounds of tomatillos (about 8 or 9), husks removed
    • 4 cups organic vegetable broth
    • 2 serrano peppers
    • 2 jalapeno peppers
    • 2 poblano peppers 
    • 1 1/2 cups cilantro, stemmed
    • 1/4 onion
    • 1 1/2 cloves of whole fresh garlic, peeled
    • 1 additional clove of whole fresh garlic, peeled
    • 1/2 onion julienned

    For Chile:

    • 2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cubed into bite size pieces
    • 1 bag of Butler brand soy curls
    • 1/2 onion, julienned
    • 2 teaspoons oregano
    • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt
    • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1 teaspoon black pepper
    • 2 tablespoons flour (I used a gf brown rice flour)

    Instructions

    Sauce:

    Preheat oven to 475°.

    1. Add tomatillos to a lined baking sheet and roast for 15-20 minutes, or until browned. Remove from oven to cool.  When cooled slice in half. 
    2. White tomatillos are in the oven; add broth, whole peppers, 1/4 onion, and 1 1/2 cloves of garlic to a large saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer on medium for about 15 minutes. 
    3. Remove vegetables, and immediately add them to a prepared ice bath, making sure to cover them adequately.
    4. Drain cooking stock into a large mixing bowl or another large vessel, BUT DO NOT DISCARD. 
    5. Once vegetables have cooled, and ice has melted, remove vegetables from the ice bath (do not discard that water either).
    6. In a mortar, add boiled garlic and one additional clove of fresh garlic (not boiled) with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Using the pestle, grind garlic into a fine paste. 
    7. Seed all peppers and cut them into thin strips. Add to blender. Slice boiled onion and add to blender with cilantro. Add garlic paste and blend until smooth. (I needed to add just a bit of my stock water to thin out).  If there is room, begin to add tomatillos, and blend.  If not, blend tomatillos separately and then add to blended pepper mixture. 

    To make Curls:

    1. Add the ice water used to cool the pepper mixture to a sauté pan and add soy curls. Boil until curls have softened, about 5-8 minutes. Do not overcook. Drain soy curls. 
    2. Heat a dutch oven over medium heat and add oil. When the oil is warmed, add julienned onion and soy curls (you may need to do this in batches). Cook until onions and curls have browned. About 5-7 minutes.
    3. When browned, remove curl/onion mix from dutch oven and toss in 2 tablespoons of flour. (I wanted a gluten-free version, so I used brown rice flour). Set aside. 
    4. In the same pan, reduce heat  to medium and add the sauce from the blender. 
    5. Add 3 cups of reserved cooking stock, oregano, garlic powder, salt and pepper, and diced potatoes. 
    6. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat. Cook until potatoes have softened, about 20 minutes. 
    7. Add soy curls, and cook until warmed through and chile has thickened.  Taste for seasoning and serve. 
    8. Garnish with pickled red onion, fresh cilantro, and plain vegan yogurt. 
    9. Serve with very lightly fried corn tortillas. Enjoy! 

    Onion Soup Gratinée

    Onion Soup Gratinée

    This soup is not mine. I wish it were because it might be the best thing I’ve ever eaten. I had always loved French Onion soup. So it was no surprise when my friend took me to a French restaurant in Soho called Balthazar that I ordered their Onion Soup Gratinée. These were my pre-vegan days, of course, and for weeks afterward, I only dreamt of this soup. It was so unbelievably satisfying that I finally reached out to my friend Kate and asked her to get me the Balthazar cookbook. The day I got the book in the mail, I went to the store, bought a 3-pound bag of onions, and went to work.

    Now that I’m vegan, there were only a few small modifications to make. I am thrilled to say the flavor has not been altered at all. The trick is to make sure that the onions are deeply caramelized. Cooking the onions may take longer than expected, about 40 minutes. Be sure to keep the heat at medium and stir frequently. You do not want the onions to burn. The other key to this soup is the cheese. I used Miyoko’s Mozzarella cheese and grated it over the toasted sourdough bread.


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    Onion Soup Gratinée

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch

    Description

    A quote from the Balthazar’s cookbook…”Borrow a custom from Bordeaux and spill a little red wine into the bottom of your nearly empty soup bowl.  The tradition, down known as chabrot, dictates a quick swirl of wine into the tail-end of the hot broth and then a hearty gulp right from the bowl.” 


    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil
    • 4 medium yellow onions, peeled, halved through the stem end, and sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 1 tablespoon unsalted vegan butter
    • 1 garlic clove, peeled and thinly sliced
    • 4 sprigs of thyme
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
    • 3/4 cup dry white wine
    • 2 quarts vegetable stock
    • 1/2 cup port
    • 6 slices of sourdough bread, about 1 inch thick, toasted
    • 2 cups Miyoko’s vegan mozzarella, coarsely grated.

    Instructions

    In a 5-quart Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, heat the olive oil over a medium flame. Add the onions and, stirring frequently to prevent burning, sauté until they reach a golden color, approximately 30 minutes.

    Add the butter, garlic, thyme, bay leaf, salt, and pepper and cook for 10 minutes. Raise the heat to high, add the white wine, bring to a boil, and reduce the wine by half, about 3 to 5 minutes.

    Add the vegetable stock and simmer for 45 minutes. Preheat the broiler. Remove the thyme springs and bay leaf, and swirl the port into the finished soup.

    Ladle the soup into the 6 ovenproof bowls.

    Fit the toasted bread into the bowls on top of the liquid, and sprinkle 1/3 cup of Mozzarella onto each slice. Place under the broiler for 3 minutes, or until the cheese melts to a crispy golden brown. Allow the soup to cool slightly, about 3 minutes, before serving.


    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    When I was in college, like most other kids my age, I lived on ramen noodles. And I’m talking about the $.25 per package ramen noodles. They were easy, cheap, and filled me up! It wasn’t until I lived with my vegetarian roommate Judy that I realized I could add things to my Ramen and make it even better. I think I started by just adding scallions. Pretty soon, I added sautéed mushrooms and garlic. Eventually, my recipe became more and more complex. When I became a vegan, the beef became tofu, and the recipe had evolved again.


    The best part of Ramen is that you can make it in an infinite number of ways. I like mine spicy, but if you don’t, you can leave out the gochujang, and it will be just fine! Gochujang is a Korean chili paste that may make dishes spicier (depending on the capsaicin in the base chili) and make dishes sweeter and smokier. Or if you like spicy but don’t want to buy something new you can use any hot sauce. You can add your favorite ingredients or whatever you happen to have on hand. There is no wrong way to make it. The key is a rich and flavorful broth. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I do!


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    Spicy Shiitake Ramen with Crispy Tofu

    • Author: Stephanie Bosch
    • Prep Time: 15
    • Cook Time: 30
    • Total Time: 45 minutes
    • Yield: 4 Servings 1x

    Description

    A delicious bowl of ramen is the ultimate comfort food.  And the best part is that you can make ramen an infinite number of ways!  This recipe happens to be my favorite, but you can use whatever ingredients you love or happen to have on hand.  Some additional toppings might include:

    • daikon radish
    • finely shredded cabbage
    • steamed bok choy
    • mushrooms (smoked are nice- see below!)
    • baby spinach
    • scallions

    Ingredients

    Scale
    • 12 to 16 ounces extra-firm tofu
    • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil, divided
    • 1 onion, sliced
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 2 tablespoons thin matchsticks peeled fresh ginger
    • 1 1/2 cups sliced shiitake mushroom caps (about 6 ounces)
    • 4 cups vegetable stock 
    • 1 sheet Kombu seaweed, rinsed
    • 1/8 cup mirin ( Japanese cooking wine)
    • 2 Tbsp Gochujang 
    • 2 tablespoons white miso paste
    • 1 tablespoon vegan soy sauce
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • pepper to taste
    • 4 heads baby bok choy, quartered lengthwise
    • 1 Fresno chile pepper, seeded and thinly sliced lengthwise
    • 12 ounces somen, udon or ramen noodles

    Instructions

    Make the Broth:

    1. In a dutch oven over medium-high heat, saute the onion in 1 tablespoon oil until tender about 3 minutes. Turn heat to medium, add the garlic and ginger and continue cooking the onions until they are deeply golden brown about 3 more minutes. Add the mushrooms to the pan; cook, stirring, until wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the vegetable stock, a sheet of kombu, mirin, gochujang. Bring to a Simmer.

    Make Tofu: 

    1. Cut the tofu into bite-sized cubes. Warm a skillet over medium heat, when heated add 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil. Add the tofu and cook for about 10 minutes until lightly browned and crisp on all sides, turning occasionally.
    2. Meanwhile, stir together 2 tablespoons miso, 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 tablespoon water. When the tofu is browned, turn off heat and carefully pour sauce over tofu (be careful, it splatters!). Stir sauce onto tofu and cook additional minute over medium heat until fragrant.

    Assemble:

    1. Add the bok choy and ramen noodles to dutch oven. Cover and cook, stirring halfway through, until the boy choy is wilted and the noodles are tender, about 4 minutes.  Add Tofu. 
    2. Top each bowl with chili.
    3. Serve Immediately. 

    Notes

    If you cannot find fresh shiitake mushrooms you can use dried.  Just be sure to chop or slice them into small pieces. 


    Nutrition

    • Calories: 400
    • Fat: 13.8
    • Saturated Fat: 1.8
    • Trans Fat: 0
    • Carbohydrates: 59.8

    Keywords: Vegan Ramen, Bok Choy, Shiitake